Tips for Mastering Multi-Channel Communications in Your Campaigns

Digital marketing concept

Digital marketing concept

You can essentially boil down the goal of any marketing campaign to one impossibly simple core concept: you’re trying to connect to your target audience and communicate a message in the most natural and organic way possible. In today’s modern environment, marketers tend to fall into two distinct camps: those who are sticking to the tried-and-true print technique and those who see digital as the way of the future. The fact of the matter is that these concepts do not have to be mutually exclusive. Learning how to take all of your available options and use them in tandem with one another is a large part of what multi-channel communications are all about.

Let the Customer Discover Your Message on Their Own Terms

For an example of effective multi-channel communication in action, consider what happens after you send out a print item to a customer using direct mail. Logic dictates that you should wait a week or two and send a follow-up message, right? As you’ve already established contact, that follow-up doesn’t have to come in the form of another mailer sent to the customer’s mailbox. It can easily be an e-mail sent to the address for that customer you have on file. Suddenly, you’ve used not one, but two, different channels effectively, allowing the customer a full range of options regarding how and why they respond and continue their journey.

That may be simplifying the situation a bit, but the benefit to the consumer of getting full control over how they’re receiving and responding to your message is what multi-channel communications are all about.

Better Campaigns Mean Better Results

In order to master multi-channel marketing and really put it to good use for your organization, you’ll need to keep a few key things in mind. For starters, you’ll need to establish a single, unified view of your customers across all channels. Any available piece of information will need to be collated together, not only so that each channel seems like a natural extension of the next, but so each channel can allow for the deeper level of customization that attracts customers in the first place.

Another factor to consider has to do with your organization’s ability to create the most consistent experience possible across all of those channels at the same time. When a customer gets an e-mail, sees a mobile ad, and receives a letter in the mail from your campaign, they all need to feel like they’re coming from the same company. One can’t be casual, while the other, stuffy and overly professional. Failure to grasp this basic concept can result in your organization coming across as a bit schizophrenic.

You’ll also need to develop your own in-house multi-channel platform to help keep track of all of these materials. You’ll need things like campaign management software, for example, giving you the ability to execute all aspects of a campaign (including both print and digital materials) all from the same unified workflow. This will also give you a better idea of tweaks that you can be making to your campaign by way of things like predictive and actionable analytics.

Multi-channel communication, in general, just goes to show you that print and digital don’t have to be an “either/or” scenario for marketers. By leveraging all of the tools you have available to you instead of playing favorites, you’ll put you and your team in a much better position to succeed moving forward.